Interactive maps | Social Classification

Cambridgeshire Atlas | Urban Rural Classification

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The 2011 rural-urban classification was released in August 2013. It is a revised version of the classification produced after the 2001 Census, but with additional detail in the urban domain. The product was sponsored by a cross-Government working group comprising Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Department of the Communities and Local Government, Office for National Statistics and the Welsh Government. 

Cambridgeshire Atlas | Urban rural classification screenshot

The data is available at three geographical levels:

 

Output Area

Output areas are treated as ‘urban’ if they were allocated to a 2011 built-up area with a population of 10,000 or more. The urban domain is then further sub-divided into three broad morphological types based on the predominant settlement component. As with the previous version of the classification, the remaining ‘rural’ output areas are grouped into three broad morphological types based on the predominant settlement component.
The classification also categorises output areas based on context – i.e. whether the wider surrounding area of a given output area is sparsely populated or less sparsely populated.

  • Urban: Major Conurbation (A1)
  • Urban: Minor Conurbation (B1)
  • Urban: City and Town (C1)
  • Urban: City and Town in a Sparse Setting (C2)
  • Rural: Town and Fringe (D1)
  • Rural: Town and Fringe in a Sparse Setting (D2)
  • Rural: Village (E1)
  • Rural: Village in a Sparse Setting (E2)
  • Rural: Hamlets and Isolated Dwellings (F1)
  • Rural: Hamlets and Isolated Dwellings in a Sparse Setting (F2)

 

Lower Layer Super Output Areas (LSOA)

The 2011 rural-urban classification of lower layer super output areas was released in August 2013. It is a revised version of the classification produced after the 2001 Census, but with additional detail in the urban domain. This product was sponsored by a cross-Government working group comprising Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Department of the Communities and Local Government, Office for National Statistics and the Welsh Government.
The classification at LSOA level is built from the RUC at OA level (the most detailed version of the classification). Assignments of LSOA to urban or rural categories are made by reference to the category to which the majority of their constituent OA are assigned.
In the RUC at OA level, output areas are treated as ‘urban’ if they were allocated to a 2011 built-up area with a population of 10,000 or more. The urban domain is then further sub-divided into three broad morphological types based on the predominant settlement component. As with the previous version of the classification, the remaining ‘rural’ output areas are grouped into three broad morphological types based on the predominant settlement component. At the LSOA scale settlement form is less homogenous than at OA level and so there are just two rural settlement types.
The classification also categorises output areas based on context – i.e. whether the wider surrounding area of a given output area is sparsely populated or less sparsely populated.

  • Urban: Major Conurbation (A1)
  • Urban: Minor Conurbation (B1)
  • Urban: City and Town (C1)
  • Urban: City and Town in a Sparse Setting (C2)
  • Rural Town and Fringe (D1)
  • Rural Town and Fringe in a Sparse Setting (D2)
  • Rural Village and Dispersed (E1)
  • Rural Village and Dispersed in a Sparse Setting (E2)

Middle Layer Super Output Areas (MSOA)

The 2011 rural-urban classification of middle layer super output areas was released in August 2013. It is a revised version of the classification produced after the 2001 Census, but with additional detail in the urban domain. This product was sponsored by a cross-Government working group comprising Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Department of the Communities and Local Government, Office for National Statistics and the Welsh Government.
The classification at MSOA level is built from the RUC at OA level (the most detailed version of the classification). Assignments of MSOA to urban or rural categories are made by reference to the category to which the majority of their constituent OA are assigned.
In the RUC at OA level, output areas are treated as ‘urban’ if they were allocated to a 2011 built-up area with a population of 10,000 or more. The urban domain is then further sub-divided into three broad morphological types based on the predominant settlement component. As with the previous version of the classification, the remaining ‘rural’ output areas are grouped into three broad morphological types based on the predominant settlement component. At the MSOA scale settlement form is less homogenous than at OA level and so there are just two rural settlement types.
The classification also categorises output areas based on context – i.e. whether the wider surrounding area of a given output area is sparsely populated or less sparsely populated.

  • Urban: Major Conurbation (A1)
  • Urban: Minor Conurbation (B1)
  • Urban: City and Town (C1)
  • Urban: City and Town in a Sparse Setting (C2)
  • Rural Town and Fringe (D1)
  • Rural Town and Fringe in a Sparse Setting (D2)
  • Rural Village and Dispersed (E1)
  • Rural Village and Dispersed in a Sparse Setting (E2)

More details available from the Office for National Statistics 2011 Rural-Urban Classification for small area geographies page: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/geography/products/area-classifications/2011-rural-urban/index.html

Cambridgeshire Atlas | The Place Survey 2008

Cambridgeshire Atlas

The Place Survey is a national survey that has been carried out by most local authorities across the country. It asks questions on the quality of life in local areas; focusing on issues such as community safety, local services, inclusion, and environment.

Cambridgeshire Atlas | The Place Survey 2008

Some of the questions included allow us to report on 18 national indicators. Reports and charts relating to the county and districts performance can be found on the main county Place Survey results page located here: http://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/business/research/consultations/placesurvey.htm

The Cambridgeshire Atlas | The Place Survey 2008 shows data at a ward level across the county. It includes all 18 of the national indicators measured in the Place Survey. In addition to this two other domains are included that show levels of satisfaction with the council and whether the council provides value for money. All data shown in the atlas are percentages allowing for the figures to be easily compared to the county, regional and national rates.

Cambridgeshire Atlas | Living Costs and Food Survey

Cambridgeshire Atlas

The Cambridgeshire Atlas | Living Costs and Food Survey presents data from the 2008 Living Costs and Food Survey (LCF), formerly known as the Expenditure and Food Survey. The survey is an amalgamation of the Family Expenditure and National Food Surveys. These surveys have been collecting data upon Britain's spending and food consumption since the 1950's. The Office for National Statistics is responsible for overall management of this invaluable supply of economic and social data.

Cambridgeshire Atlas | Living Costs and Food Survey

A total of 5271 households took part in the 2008 survey across Great Britain. The Office for National Statistics validate and adjust the data by using weights. They also append the social classification Output Area Classification (OAC) to the data. This helps us to gain a greater knowledge concerning the expenditure of differing sections of our society.

The data presented shows the expenditure and income of the 21 OAC groups. This data applies at a national level but the use of OAC provides local intelligence for the county.